CENTER FOR INTERNAL AND REGIONAL SECURITY (IRES)

STUDYING CONFLICT | REVIEWING HUMAN SECURITY | AUDITING STABILITY AND PEACE

The Centre for Internal and Regional Security (IReS) was inaugurated in March 2012 by the then Indian National Security Advisor, Shiv Shankar Menon, at IPCS’ Sixth Annual Armed Conflicts in South Asia conference.

IReS’ research focuses on the study of political and security-related developments in India and South Asia, as well as the extended neighbourhood. With an acknowledgement of the very real conundrum faced during reconciling ideals with ground-reality, IReS in its research output consistently and objectively aims to uphold universal values of cooperation, peaceful coexistence, and responsible conduct. The Centre endeavours to achieve this by contributing informed assessments to the policy-makers of today, and by engaging the leaders of tomorrow – today’s youth. Additionally, recognising existing as well as evolving complexities in the nature and experiences of peace and conflict, IReS research also studies the evolving contours of these concepts.

Major focuses and projects at IReS identify and study existing as well as evolving issues impacting peace, security, and stability in India and its extended neighbourhood, with an objective of arriving at sound, comprehensive and practical frameworks for solutions. To this end, the Centre places equal emphasis on both data and context.

Through its research and events that have thematic as well as geographical contours, IReS aims to facilitate dialogue on existing and emerging traditional and non-traditional security challenges in the region by engaging the academia, policy-makers, international organisations and young scholars.

IReS research typically covers issues in national and regional security; defence and strategic issues; state stability; state fragility; state legitimacy; nationhood; foreign policy; inter-state and intra-state relations, and domestic and international approaches towards addressing contemporary security challenges such as domestic and transnational terrorism, radicalism, organised crime, and armed conflict; gender related conflict; rule of law; nation-building, evolving structures and patterns among non-state actors; regional and bilateral security relationships; migration; disaster management; and human security, among others.

Some of the past special focuses and studies include, but are not limited to:

  • State Failure and Fragility in South Asia
  • Water Conflicts in South Asia [Indus Water Dialogues] (event)
  • Ladakh 2013: Economy, Education, Society & Politics, New Issues, Young Voices
  • Tali-Qaeda Reader: IPCS Analyses on Taliban and al Qaeda
  • Af-Pak Plus
  • South Asian Water Politics: Indus, Brahmaputra & Beyond
  • The Radicalism Project
  • Naxal Violence Focus
  • Armed Conflicts in South Asia [7 edited volumes, 2008-2014]
  • India-NATO Dialogue (event)
  • India-Pakistan Bilateral (event)
  • IPCS Neighbourhood Watch (Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Myanmar)
  • IPCS Forecast Series
  • IPCS Global Transitions Compendium
IReS

'Pale Blue Dot': This iconic photograph was taken by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft from a distance of almost 4 billion miles from Earth, the furthest extent of space travelled by humanity at that time at a public lecture at Cornell University on 13 October 1994, astronomer Carl Sagan - who requested that NASA turn the spacecraft around in 1990 to take the image - presented this image, and characterising the history of all existence on earth, and said “…everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there—on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.” Image Courtesy: NASA

Taking into account current and evolving realities, since 2015, IReS has expanded its scope to include the study of cyber security, social conflict, gender, and climate and natural resources-related conflict. At present, the Centre is also laying the foundations of a dedicated focus on the securitisation of space.

Research conducted under the aegis of IReS manifests in a wide range of formats, such as commentaries, long forms, podcasts etc. Among others, research contributors include subject matter experts and scholars from IPCS; scholars, practitioners, military officials, bureaucrats, and diplomats from India as well as from countries and regions in South Asia, Central Asia, West Asia, Europe and the Americas. Analyses by scholars and experts associated with IReS have been published and been featured on a variety of Indian and international print, audio and visual platforms.

IReS

'Pale Blue Dot': This iconic photograph was taken by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft from a distance of almost 4 billion miles from Earth, the furthest extent of space travelled by humanity at that time at a public lecture at Cornell University on 13 October 1994, astronomer Carl Sagan - who requested that NASA turn the spacecraft around in 1990 to take the image - presented this image, and characterising the history of all existence on earth, and said “…everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there—on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.” Image Courtesy: NASA